Nothing but the highest quality when purchasing jewellery

As a connoisseur, collector or investor, you are constantly on the lookout for the perfect masterpiece, coveted works of art with a unique style or precious cut gems of a specific size or exclusive origin. Draw on our expertise and allow us to find you specifically requested pieces: from diamond jewellery and fine coloured gems to sought-after vintage compositions. Thanks to our global network of expert business partners, we can help you advance your search for exquisite pieces of jewellery or gemstones.

– Buying jewellery –

Buying Jewellery

We are more than happy to advise you in person in our Zurich salesroom or at one of our various trade fair stands. In our online shop you will also find a small selection from our assortment of over 1,000 exceptional pieces for your collection, gifts or asset Portfolio.

– Zurich –

Zurich salesroom

Edigem Ltd. is set to open its first salesroom in Zurich in early 2019 under the name EDIGEM Fine Jewels.

– The history of jewellery –

Jewellery periods and history

Precious jewels are as diverse as time and the master hands from which they originate. A bijou links a grand past to a brilliant future. Find out more about the ages of everlasting beauty – we look forward to sharing our knowledge with you.

c.1835 – 1900

Victorian era

Named after Queen Victoria, who reigned over the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 1837 to 1901 – at a time when jewellery was a symbol of the high society and reflected royal tastes. Classic designs emanating from this period are the Bourbon style and fleur-de-lys. Following the death of Prince Albert in 1861, the Victorian jewellery period was marked by mourning jewellery. Primarily old- and rose-cut diamonds were used as well as silver or silver-on-gold Oriental pearls.

 

c.1884 – 1914

Belle époque

The period between 1884 and the outbreak of the First World War is often described as the belle époque or ‘beautiful age’. Light romantic, naturalistic and floral designs defined this period. Jewellery was designed in the so-called garland style. Fine and delicate workmanship distinguishes jewellery in the belle époque. The metals used for the jewellery were predominantly yellow and rose gold, embellished with enamel or glass (plique-à-jour) or set with softly coloured gemstones.

c. 1895 – 1915

Art nouveau

In Paris, jewellery artist René Lalique started creating new worlds of form and colour in 1885, finding his inspiration in symbolism and natural forms such as lilies, dragonfly wings, butterflies or even fruit. His preferred materials were glass, enamel, mother-of-pearl, ivory and horn. This period was defined by craftsmanship and the originality of the subject.

c. 1915 – 1935

Art deco

The golden age of haute joaillerie. Geometric designs with rigid lines and patterns. Pendant earrings, decorative bracelets or double-clip brooches were the jewellery accessories of choice. À jour crafted jewels, mille-griffe settings and metal engravings are typical of this period. Gems were at their height during the art deco period. Old-cut diamonds, onyx, corals or carved corundum were primarily crafted in platinum.

c. 1935 – 1960

Retro

The retro period was marked by grand and lavish jewellery. Chunky bracelets and brooches made from yellow or rose gold were the accessories of choice. Metals were frequently highly polished and – depending on whether they were early or late retro – solid or hollow. Due to the Second World War, platinum and bulky gemstones were in short supply. The development of the ‘invisible setting’ by Van Cleef & Arpels for smaller gemstones is also an accomplishment from this period.

c. from 1970

Contemporary

This decade experienced the revival of a luxurious, ostentatious style in which yellow gold, diamonds and the three classics – rubies, sapphires and emeralds – combined to create pieces of jewellery of great effect. Cabochon-cut coloured gems and all kinds of gold chains were hugely popular.

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